AG: Ex-Penn State coach abused boys ages 8 to 17

MARK SCOLFORO Associated Press Published:

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) -- A court filing Thursday by prosecutors in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse case said his alleged victims ranged in age from 8 to 17, and that crimes involving eight of the boys occurred on the Penn State University campus.

The attorney general's office issued a "bill of particulars" that said crimes involving one boy took place in Florida and Texas, while another boy was abused at his own school.

Two of the boys, identified in a grand jury report as Victim 2 and Victim 8, remain unidentified to authorities, according to the court filing.

In most cases, prosecutors said they could not provide specific dates, noting some crimes occurred over many years, and the alleged victims were children at the time.

The document, produced at the request of Sandusky's lawyer, discloses details of the allegations that might help them prepare a defense. Prosecutors said assaults happened from 1996 to 2009 and occurred at Sandusky's home, in State College hotels, at Penn State athletic facilities and inside a car.

For Victim 4, the attorney general's office said offenses took place in Florida in December 1998 and January 1999, when Penn State was playing in the Outback Bowl; and in Texas in December 1999, when Sandusky's final game occurred in the Alamo Bowl.

The reference to other states comes less than a week after Penn State disclosed a subpoena from the U.S. Attorney's Office in Harrisburg, concrete evidence that a federal investigation is under way.

Sandusky, 68 is confined to his home while he awaits trial on 52 criminal counts. He denies the allegations, and his lawyer did not immediately reply to a message seeking comment Thursday.

A spokesman for the attorney general's office declined comment.

On Wednesday, Judge John Cleland turned down Sandusky's request for a two-month delay that would have given them more time to prepare for trial. Cleland has tentatively scheduled trial to begin with jury selection on May 14.