Navy trains not just for terrorists, but traffic

BROCK VERGAKIS Associated Press Published:

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) -- When the Navy trains for responding to a terrorist attack on one of its U.S. bases, it's not just explosives, gunmen and suspicious fishing boats that the service's top leaders are concerned about. It's the traffic.

That vulnerability was highlighted in major Navy ports like those in San Diego, Mayport, Fla., and in the Pacific Northwest during last year's annual exercise, when heightened security at bases resulted in severe gridlock. Navy officials say that traffic leaves sailors waiting to get on base vulnerable to attack and can keep emergency vehicles from being able to quickly respond.

Navy officials are vowing to fix the traffic problems for this year's weeklong exercise, which begins Monday and affects every Navy installation in the continental U.S.